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Put those turkey leftovers to good use!
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Post-Thanksgiving Meal Plan

So . . . how did things go? Did you make the best of an unfamiliar holiday? As this hits your inbox I will be pondering a pile of leftovers from Thanksgiving dinner #1, with just the four of my immediate family gang, but also quarantining to have Thanksgiving dinner #2 with my mom and sister (fingers crossed). 
 
If you had any version of a traditional Thanksgiving, I’m betting you have leftovers to spare. And if you made a whole turkey (I did), there is quite a bit of that waiting to be put to good use. 
 
But before we dig into the recipes, know that the next couple weeks I will be taking a pause from the holiday food planning. A dip back into weeknight meals, cold weather cooking, food that makes us feel whole and sane and that seems manageable. It’s a long haul, no doubt about it. And even though no one is dodging the day-to-day effects of this pandemic, those of us who are lucky enough to not be worrying about food on our tables must take a moment to appreciate that. And to pay attention to others who might need our help.
 
To that end, I ask you to consider making a donation to No Kid Hungry (national) or City Harvest (NYC) so that others may have enough this holiday season. And I thank you from the bottom of every part of me.
 
Now, waste not, want not. Here’s what to do with those leftovers.

Wishing you all health and peace and better days to come,
Katie
 

The most comforting, satisfying way to use up leftover turkey, including a simple homemade stock. I’ll share that I have made about five or six turkeys and turkey breasts this fall, testing away on recipes, and this recipe has been a lifesaver in terms of using up all of that extra turkey meat in a way that my family is happy to eat week after week (also: freezable!).

Click here for the recipe.

For no apparent reason, every year I think of posole as I face down the remains of the turkey. A warm, comforting, soup-ey stew is always in order, and the chewy-soft texture and gentle flavor of posole (dried and soaked hominy, easily available in the Hispanic section of the market or sometimes the bean aisle) is super pleasing. (Again: freezable.)

Click here for the recipe.

This version of one of the most delicious and classic sandwiches in the sandwich lexicon uses turkey for a lighter change of pace. I sure do love this sandwich. And when was the last time you had Russian dressing? It’s been too long for me.

Click here for the recipe.

Picadillo is a Latin American dish similar to hash and popular in various versions in Cuba, the Philippines, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, and Mexico. This slightly unorthodox version features turkey, peppers, onions, garlic, various spices, raisins, olives, and crispy potatoes folded in right at the end. Just delicious. Use chopped leftover turkey instead of ground and you will have yourself one hell of a turkey second act.

Click here for the recipe.

Enchiladas are a perfect way to use up extra shredded cooked meat. The original recipe calls for shredded chicken, not turkey, but the general rule of thumb is that anywhere chicken can be used, turkey can sub right in. These have a little kick; how much depends a bit on your poblanos.

Click here for the recipe.

Again with turkey instead of chicken, and if you have some leftover sautéed mushrooms from the big holiday meal, add them right in.

Click here for the recipe.

BUT WAIT, THERE'S MORE . . .
See More Recipes on TheMom100.com
If you have meal-planning gripes, questions, or things you want to suggest, come hang out with me on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter!

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