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After the FBI revised its crime data collection system in 2021, nearly 40% of law enforcement agencies across the country didn't successfully submit crime data to the federal database.  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌
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Dear Friends,

After the FBI revised its crime data collection system in 2021, nearly 40% of law enforcement agencies across the country didn't successfully submit crime data to the federal database.

That’s more than 7,000 of the 18,000 police departments and sheriff’s offices, according to data we obtained from the FBI.

The nation’s largest police departments, like the New York Police Department and the Los Angeles Police Department, did not report data to the FBI. Nor did most agencies in states like California and Florida.

The missing data creates a crisis in the FBI’s nearly century-old crime data collection program, criminologists warn. Policymakers and the public will have to work much harder and wait longer to know how crime — from murder and shooting to shoplifting and car theft — changed nationwide in 2021.

With criminal justice and public safety at the center of many midterm elections, the crisis of national crime data couldn’t have happened at a worse time.

To help communities and local journalists understand if their police department reported data to the FBI, we released the 2021 participation data in the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program. We also partnered with Axios Local to tell the story of what the missing data means across the country, including Florida, Arkansas, Pennsylvania, Arizona, and many more places.

The gap in national crime data is likely to last for years, as police agencies transition to the new system. We hope our coverage sheds light on which departments are slow to act, and what that means to people who live under their jurisdictions.

Thank you so much for reading,

Weihua Li
Data Reporter
The Marshall Project

P.S. If you'd like to help make more investigations like this possible, please consider donating to The Marshall Project today. All new gifts are currently being matched, up to $50,000, by our generous board member Jim Leitner.

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