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Celebrity Culture and Social Inquiry 
64th Edition
 
Media Experts

Prof. P. David Marshall
Dr Anita Krajnc
Dr Louis Massey 
Dr Samita Nandy
Dr Jackie Raphael 
Dr Celia Lam

Dr. Basuli Deb
Dr Hilary Wheaton
Dr Mira Moshe
Dr Nandana Bose
Dr Will Visconti
Shannon Skinner 

Advisory Board

Dr Anita Krajnc
Dr Samita Nandy
Dr Jackie Raphael 
Dr Celia Lam
Dr William Huddy
Dr Frank Wilson
Dr Nicole Bojko
Dr Basuli Deb
Dr Hilary Wheaton
Dr Mira Moshe
Dr Yaya Mori
Josh Nathan (late)

Editorial Board


Dr Robert Caine
Dr Hilary Wheaton
Dr Jarret Ruminski
Dr Will Visconti 
Nidhi Farfagalia
Kiera Obbard
Georgia Hertz
Christine Bode

Founder & Director

Dr Samita Nandy

Recommended Publications

Celebrity Studies


Becoming Brands: Celebrity, Activism and Politics

Building Bridges in Celebrity Studies

Celebrity & The Media

A Companion to Celebrity

Personas and Places

Fame in Hollywood North

CrossBridge

Bridging Gaps: Higher Education, Media and Society

 
 
 

 

 



We are pleased to announce our free webinar “Sustainability and Persona Branding” for worldwide CMCS members and past Bridging Gaps delegates! Register here and save the dates to join:
 
1) Saturday, August 11 (9 am PDT / 12 pm EST / 5 pm GMT)
 
       - Featuring CMCS Lisbon 2018 best paper award Maria Murumaa-Mengel and public influencer Dominique Drakeford
 
2) Saturday, September 1 (9 am PDT / 12 pm EST / 5 pm GMT)

  • Featuring CMCS Lisbon 2018 best video award winner Victoria Kannen and 2017 LA media panelist Kevin del Principe

Webinar Registration: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/sustainability-persona-branding-webinar-tickets-48582241793

For more information, visit http://cmc-centre.com/2018webinar/

We have limited space, so please register in advance and log in 5 minutes prior to the start time!
 
Special thanks to Nicole Bojko for hosting the webinar and to Kiera Obbard for continuing discussions we had at the 7th international CMCS conference Bridging Gaps: Where is Ethical Glamour in Celebrity Culture? in Lisbon last month.
 
Memorable moments of our conference can be viewed
here.
 
For general research purposes, you may check out my recent book chapter in (Extra)Ordinary? The Concept of Authenticity in Celebrity & Fan Studies that also features works by scholars in the field. Details of this book as well as new Call for Papers are below.
 
Kindly note that we receive many requests to share CFPs that do not have links. We archive them in our blog so that you can re-visit any time:  
http://cmc-centre.com/category/multimedia/
 
Hope you are having a great start to August!
 
See you at our webinar on Saturday, August 11 and September 1!
 
Sincerely,

Samita Nandy @famecritic

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Book Release

(Extra)Ordinary?: The Concept of Authenticity in Celebrity and Fan Studies (2018)
By Jade Alexander and Katarzyna Bronk
URL:
https://brill.com/view/title/35655

Table of Contents

Introduction: (Extra)Ordinary?
By: Jade Alexander and Katarzyna Bronk
Pages: 1–7

Constructing Celebrity

“The Big Fellow Is Dead!”: Michael Collins as Celebrity and Nationalist Martyr
By: Amber Anna Colvin
Pages: 11–33

Mediating Bieber in Canada: Authenticating Nation in Fame
By: Samita Nandy
Pages: 34–53

Literary Celebrity, Politics and the Nobel Prize: The Nobel Lecture as an Authorial Self-Fashioning Platform
By: Sandra Mayer
Pages: 54–74

(Re)Envisioning Stardom

Oscar Wilde’s Long Afterlife: Victorian Celebrity and Its Transformations in Modern Culture
By: Anna Fomichenko
Pages: 77–92

Touching Fame: Exploring Interactional Dynamics between Local Celebrities and Fans in Sydney’s Roller Derby Scene
By: Jade Alexander
Pages: 93–118

Celebrity Awards, Fan Communities and the Reconstruction of “High” and “Low” Cultures
By: Mira Moshe
Pages: 119–136

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Call for Papers, Edited Collection: Starring Tom Cruise
By Sean Redmond
 
Tom Cruise is one of the most successful Hollywood film stars of the last 35 years, with a cumulative worldwide box office of nearly $8 billion dollars. His star image moves across genres and forms, is product and franchise, and is also connected to ‘serious’ cinema through his work with auteurs. His private life has warranted a great deal of attention whether it be through his connection to scientology, his numerous failed marriages, or the ‘queer space’ he is placed within through fan work and gossip mongering. Cruise is an action hero and romantic lead and yet finds himself in homoerotic and homosocial relationships which unsettle and undermine these heterosexual scripts.  Cruise is also an authentic star, who does his own stunts even as his aging body wanes, and who brings this embodied verisimilitude to the roles he takes on.
 
When a film stars Tom Cruise a series of unruly forces are set in train, which this edited collection intends to assess.
 
Starring Tom Cruise is looking for chapters of 6,000 to 8,000 words in length to consider the following themes and issues:
  • The Cruise star vehicle
  • The Cruise franchise
  • Gender and sexuality
  • Cruise and masculinity
  • Queer space
  • Desire
  • The Cruise performance
  • Cruise against ‘type’
  • Fandom
  • The Cruise monomyth
  • American exceptionalism
  • Age and masculinity
  • Whiteness
  • Marketing and promotions
  • Specific film textual analysis
  • Religion and faith
  • Postmodern Cruise
  • Cruise and parody
  • The Cruise confession
  • The Cruise interview
  • The Cruise Marriage
  • Authenticity and simulacra
  • Hollywood and Cruise
  • Star, genre, authorship
  • Action
  • Style
  • Transnational Cruise
The edited collection will contain 12-16 chapters, and a publisher has shown provisional interest in publishing the volume. In the first instance could you forward 150-200 word abstracts plus short bibliography to Sean Redmond for Friday 3rd August 2018: s.redmond@deakin.edu.au
 
Subsequent writing deadlines will be for 2019.

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Call for Papers: Making Stars: Biography and Eighteenth-Century Celebrity
By Kristina Straub and Nora Nachumi
 
A celebrity is not a person, exactly, but a construct established through the public discourse and representation that we now think of as celebrity culture. During the long eighteenth century, biography was key to an earlier form of celebrity culture that anticipates what we experience as modern celebrity.  This volume proposes to explore the relationship between biography and celebrity in the long eighteenth century. In inviting essays, we keep that relationship open to definition: are biography and celebrity mutually constitutive? Does one drive the other? Are there contradictions as well as connections between biography as a genre and the celebrity culture that is manifest in a wide range of print, visual materials, and embodied performances?  Similarly, we maintain an open definition of celebrity to include the many different variations in the period: theatrical, criminal, aristocratic, royal, and even the freakish.
 
We welcome work that clarifies and gives nuance to the prehistory of the celebrity bio as a genre and that thinks about ways in which particular material and ideological conditions shaped the formal and experiential effects of celebrity during the period roughly between 1660 and 1830. Essays might focus, for example, on comparing biography’s relationship to celebrity representation in other genres and media; a specific challenge or problem posed by a person or text or a particular form of representation; or contested representational forms. We also are interested in work that grows out of or reflects on the process of writing a modern biography of an eighteenth-century celebrity.  How do biographies create celebrity? How do various rhetorics of biographical discourse contest or refuse celebrity? How might attention to the formal rhetorics of biographical studies provide us new ways to think about celebrity culture in the long eighteenth century and conversely how might the terms of celebrity studies allow us new insights into biography?
 
What case studies allow us to see the constitutive work of celebrity and biography in action?
 
Questions regarding potential submissions should be sent to both editors:
Kristina Straub <
ks3t@andrew.cmu.edu> and Nora Nachumi <nachumi@yu.edu>.
Abstracts of 300 – 400 words are due September 15, 2018.  Please include a brief bio. (150 words max.) as well.
 
Contact Info:
 
Kristina Straub
Professor of English
Director of Literary and Cultural Studies Program
Carnigie Mellon University

ks3t@andrew.cmu.edu
 
Nora Nachumi
Associate Professor
Department of English
Yeshiva University

nachumi@yu.edu
Contact Email:
nachumi@yu.edu
URL:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/14PTM7kzUlEELcYj8tKCb-qSRJ5coHUz8BWE27pIZBGE/edit?usp=sharing

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C4: The Conference on Contemporary Celebrity Culture, Drake University (Des Moines, Iowa, USA), June 9-11, 2019.

By organizers: Renee Cramer, Professor of Law Politics and Society & or Craig Owens, Professor of English, Drake University
 
“There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about,” opines the dissipated Lord Henry in the opening chapter of The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890), Oscar Wilde’s novel of celebrity. Less blithely, however, Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie reminds us, in her TED talk “The Danger of a Single Story” (2009), that the way we talk about others can also recapitulate cultural injustice: “Power is the ability not just to tell the story of another person, but to make it the definitive story of that person.” For Adichie, who kept her pregnancy very much out of the public eye, being talked about is often unwelcome, especially under pressure to “perform pregnancy.”
 
C4: The Conference on Contemporary Celebrity Culture (Drake University; June 9-11, 2019) will consider the problematic of being “talked about” nearly 130 years after Wotton’s prescient utterance, in what some might argue is a very different celebrity-cultural moment.
 
We invite abstracts for presentations on any aspect of celebrity culture in the 20th and 21st centuries, from any of a wide range of humanistic, creative, and social scientific perspectives. We particularly welcome playful, provocative, and experimental approaches and formats.
 
Topics may include:
  • Readings and analyses of individual celebrities.
  • Sociologies and anthropologies of celebrity culture.
  • Historicizations of particular celebrity formations.
  • Comparative cultural studies of celebrity.
  • Celebrity influence and influencers
  • The economics and politics of celebrity.
  • Celebrity as it manifests itself beyond the entertainment industry.
  • Anti-celebrity and alt-celebrity formations (Anonymous, Banksy).
  • Effects of celebrity on everyday life.
  • Celebrity practitioners (chefs, musicians, athletes, et al.)
  • Cults of celebrity.
  • Celebrity and its relationship to fame and notoriety.
  • Micro- and niche celebrity.
  • Fandoms and fan culture.
  • Celebrities and mass & social media.
  • Celebrity and “Reality.”
  • Celebrity fashion and branding.
  • The scholarship of celebrity.
  • Celebrity as performance art

C4 will feature up to 24 non-simultaneous, 20-minute plenary presentations over two days, in addition to an opening dinner, closing reception, and keynote presentation. Participants will be asked to attend all presentations and will be invited to submit article-length versions of their papers at the end of summer 2019 for inclusion in a peer-reviewed collection of essays.
 
Thanks to support from the Drake University College of Arts and Sciences and the Center for the Humanities at Drake University, a modest registration fee of $150 will cover all conference-related expenses, including daily breakfast, opening dinner, and audio-visual technology needs. Conference-rate hotel accommodations near Drake’s campus will be available to participants.
 
Please send proposals, including a 350-to-500-word abstract and a brief author’s biography, in the body of an email, to 
celebrity.conference@drake.edu by 15 September 2018. Please do not send attachments. Decisions will be announced by October 31, 2018; registration deadline: Februrary 1, 2019.
 
Questions may be addressed to the C4 organizers: Renee Cramer, Professor of Law Politics and Society (
renee.cramer@drake.edu) or Craig Owens, Professor of English (craig.owens@drake.edu), both of Drake University. Please, however, do not send proposals and abstracts to these addresses.

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