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Rise & Conquer   |   To The Victor Go The Spoils   |   View this email in your browser
T H U R S D A Y    2 . 2 1 . 1 9



Good morning from Portland, Oregon. We're on the move this morning. Up in Portland for the day for an exciting House of Spoils meeting. Great things coming. Does anyone have a lunch rec near PDX?

Yesterday's housekeeping note is worth repeating for those who missed it: If you've been missing some issues lately or if they've been going to spam it's time to add us to your address book. This is just the quick and easy win you need to set yourself up for a productive day
Click here for an easy guide to whitelisting our newsletter! Takes just three seconds and you'll never miss an issue again.

Have a great day.



 

 

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@MEIRR
Lapland, Finland
@NATTESFERD
Kirkjufell, Iceland
@CAMERON_HAMMOND
Cape Town, South Africa
W H A T   W E ' R E   E Y E I N G
Palm is an exciting new ultra-mobile, super-compact device designed for anyone looking to reduce the amount of tech in their lives so they can focus on living (while still having access to the essentials like calls ,messages, maps and music). The  lightweight device is about the size of a credit card, syncs with iOS and Android, fits in any pocket and is waterproof so you can use it at the gym and on your adventures. Consider this a step in the right direction towards unshackling yourself from oversized screens. Check it out below.
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Caribou - Can't Do Without You
(Tale of Us & Mano Le Tough Remix)


Listen to our 242 song master playlist here.
*Pro tip: To see new songs appear first, sort the playlist by date (calendar icon).
Listen Now
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THE CUT

The walls of seaweed first started washing over the white-sand beaches of Tulum, Mexico, in 2015. They came from deep in the Atlantic and across the Caribbean, darkening the neon-blue water. Some of the seaweed was puke brown, while the rest was dark red, and in the summer it was so thick that swimming was impossible. Dead fish and other sea creatures were mixed in, and the piles on the beach smelled like rotten eggs. Where was it coming from? Development in the Amazon was leaching more fertilizer into increasingly warmer oceans — maybe that was it. But some residents of Tulum, which has long attracted visitors predisposed toward the mystical, thought that Mother Nature had simply had enough: The first time one local remembered seeing the seaweed was after one of Tulum’s many oceanfront venues hosted a wild party and put up a barrier to close off the beach.

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