Connections E-Newsletter Issue 18, May - June 2015  

Activities
 
ENEA Office Conducts North-East Asian Young Conservation Leadership Programme(NEA-YCLP)
17 - 21 May 2015, Ganghwa Island and other areas, Republic of Korea

NEA-YCLP 2015 participants and trainers pose for a group photo with the ENEA Office staff.
NEA-YCLP 2015 participants and trainers pose for a group photo with the ENEA Office staff. 
 
The ENEA Office, as the Secretariat of the North-East Asian Subregional Programme for Environmental Cooperation (NEASPEC), implements the Nature Conservation Project on habitat rehabilitation and conservation for key migratory birds in the subregion. In this connection, the ENEA Office supported the North-East Asian Young Conservation Leadership Programme (NEA-YCLP) in May. NEA-YCLP gathered young conservationists, landscape architects and ecologists from the five North-East Asian countries (Russia, Mongolia, China, Republic of Korea and Japan) as well as international experts and trainers. The young participants carried out surveys of the key habitats of Black-faced Spoonbills in Ganghwa Island and its surrounding areas and habitat mapping based on their findings. 

During the 5-day programme, the young conservationists and ecologists enjoyed an opportunity to learn about the history of conservation and its challenges in North-East Asia and to propose ideas about how to better manage and conserve the habitats of border areas.

The participants presented their findings and lessons learned at the ENEA Office on the final day of the Programme. All the participants stressed the importance of including the local community when it comes to conservation of species and habitats, as the local residents are always there and can have a direct impact on the species and the ecological system. The NEA-YCLP served as a channel through which the young conservationists and ecologists of the North-East Asian countries could share their knowledge and best practices as well as the conservation efforts taking place in their respective countries, laying the groundwork for more delicate cooperation among the countries in the future. 
 

The Black-faced Spoonbill has the most restricted distribution of all spoonbills, and it is the only species of spoonbills regarded as endangered. Black-faced Spoonbills reached a serious low in population in the 1990s, and it is believed that the principal cause of the decline of this species is the destruction of its habitat. The total population of the Black-faced Spoonbill is only around 2,000. They migrate along a portion of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway, and live in the two Koreas, Japan, Taiwan, coastal China, the Philippines, Vietnam and northeastern Russia. 

Black-faced Spoonbills in Ganghwa Island, ROK (Photo Courtesy of Kim Yeonsoo)
Black-faced Spoonbills in Ganghwa Island, ROK (Photo Courtesy of Kim Yeonsoo)

 
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