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This newsletter provides a overview of the upcoming events.


 


 

RCC Monthly Newsletter - July 2016

NOTICE
RCC office telephone number
has been changed to 604-817-6365
(From April 15 2016)




Soup Kitchen



Thank you to Lisa and Gary for organizing RCC's final soup kitchen at Drop-in Centre in downtown East side. Also we would like to thank all of our RCC members who have volunteered and helped our community over the past two decades of soup kitchen. It is unfortunate that RCC must discontinue the monthly soup kitchen due to the changes that have taken place at Drop-in Centre. However, we would like to express our appreciation to the centre's staff for giving RCC members the opportunity to contribute to our city. Thank you!



 

 




 

From Generation to Generation

 

PART 1

 

 

Kakutaro was very busy with the various duties that his position as chief director entailed. He was so busy that he rarely had time to spend with his family. Nevertheless, he was acutely aware of his responsibilities toward them and one day he took them to the National Sports Arena in Ryogoku.

 

The Ryogoku stadium is famous in Japan as the home of Sumo wrestling, but they did not go there to watch sumo. In those days, when the seasonal sumo tournaments were not being held, the arena was used for various other events. In the summer there was a festival, and in autumn there was an exhibition of dolls made from chrysanthemum flowers. All the members of Kakutaro's family went to see the show. Tsugunori was still very small at that time.

 

Everyone was in high spirits. They entered the towering dome of the arena and walked along a path lined with flags of newspaper companies which were sponsoring the event, and then passed through the entrance arch to the exposition. The huge hall had been partitioned off with thick wooden boards or red white striped curtains so as to make many small stalls. It was full of decorations and exhibits, and visitors walked along the passageways looking at the stalls and exhibits and talking to their families and friends.

 

Many people were gathered around one attraction in particular. Little children were dancing and singing a song about snow and hail, and when he heard the song Kakutaro became so amused by the words that he burst out laughing. It was as though he had never experienced such a thing before. From his boyhood to his forties he had led a life of self-restraint and concentrated study, never allowing himself time for enjoyment, never going to the cinema, the Kabuki theatre, or other shows. Even during the little time he had for relaxation at home, he would lie down and go into deep contemplation.

 

The performance was a simple show for children, and in the audience some of the parents pulled at their children's hands to make them leave. Kakutaro, however, was enjoying himself immensely. It seemed to relax him, and he was laughing to his heart's content. His laughter was so innocent and childlike that it seemed to be untouched by the impurity of the world. Toshiko's heart was filled with emotion as she watched her husband laugh in this way. She realized then that the way a man who is leading a creative existence is completely different from that of others. In front of the temporary stage Toshiko became keenly aware of the difference between someone who is confident and creative, who thinks that everything that wells up within then is a reflection of the Buddha's wisdom, and someone who fells uncertain unless they do things in the same way as everyone else.

 

Still, Toshiko could not help having mixed feelings about her husband. She was deeply touched and yet sorrowed by his way of life. What bothered her the most, when Kakutaro was at home, was connected to the way he dealt with merchants and workmen. They had a gardener, for example, who, while working the garden, liked to chat about this and that. Kakutaro would scold him loudly, and so afterward, Toshiko felt the need to apologise to him.

 

Kakutaro believed that unnecessary gossip sometimes lead one to speak ill of others without noticing. Kim Kotani shared this belief and often said, “Ill words spoken of others will always return to poison you.”

 

- From "A Life of Kakutaro Kubo" Ch. 11 p.146-147

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

Upcoming Events



July 9th (Sat.)
Gathering @ Miyamotos
1:00 PM

 

July 18th (Mon.)
Gathering @ Miyamotos
1:00 PM


July 26th (Tue.)
Committee Meeting @ Miyamotos
6:00 PM


July 29th (Fri.)
Golf Tournament
@ UBC
12:00 PM


July 29th (Fri.)
Potluck & Gin-Tasting 
@ Lisa's Place
6:00 PM



Membership Fee

$4.00 / month

Your membership fee and donation will be used to support the needy people in our society.




 


 
Visit our website: http://www.reiyukai.org/
 
Office Hours:

Monday to Friday

10am-5pm

5592 Osler Street
Vancouver, BC
Canada V6M 2W9
Tel: (604) 817-6365
Email: humanitarian@reiyukai.org