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Apt. 11D
Laura McKenna's Publications and Posts

January 17, 2020

Hi all!

It's January Jersey. Which means the sky is a greige color that all the designers are putting on their walls.

I know all about griege, because we're in the middle of a painting project at home. Between being grounded in the house with various medical testing for Ian and a dull spot in between writing projects, I have some time on my hand. I decided that it was time to rent a steamer from Home Depot and tackle the last two rooms in our home that still had the previous owner's wallpaper on the walls.

So, our bedroom furniture is covered with plastic tarps, and my office is inhospitable, until we can finish the job. When we embarked on this plan, I expected to finish off in a week or two. In reality, we are still a month of weekends away from applying any paint -- griege or otherwise - on the walls. 

I have a writing topic on hold. The topic is all approved by an editor, but we're just waiting for one of the presidential candidates to bring up a specific education topic. The candidate is not cooperating, so I've done a little background research and am just waiting. And catching up with my other job, which is housewifery. 

I never planned on being a stay at home parent, who works gigs on the side. I planned on having a prestigious job in the university or a policy think tank. That's why I wasted most of my twenties in graduate school and finished the PhD. But here am I. Drinking rosé with the soccer moms and spinning away the muffin tops on Monday mornings. 

On most days, that's just fine. I have time to paint walls, check in on my mom, make sure the college kid has filled out the right forms for next year's dorm assignments, attend IEP meetings, talk with the lawyer about the guardianship papers, and arrange appointments with a contractor who has to fix the hole in the foundation by the garage. 

Other days, I get impatient with my situation. Freelancers don't get the choice assignments or get paid very well. I miss teaching college classes, even six years later; though I don't miss grading papers, which always sucked. I miss the identity of a full time job. 

As a neurotic progressive, I also feel guilty. Others don't have the option to have a flexible job. I'm able to support my kids, both the special ed and the typical one, so they're two steps ahead of kids who don't have a parent like me. Which is totally unfair. In a world that is falling apart, I'm staring at Benjamin Moore paint colors so long that I have actual opinions on Grey Owl grey versus Metropolitan grey. I should be out there in the thick of things, making changes, instead of looking at Pinterest boards. 

I handle the guilt by writing. Writing is a source of guilt, too, because writing is becoming more and more of a rich person's game; there are fewer and fewer traditional journalism jobs. But it is an effective soap box. I also join local political organizations and progressive parents groups. 

There is a growing parental political movement happening. Parents -- okay, mostly women -- are showing up at board of ed meetings and state house protests. They're forming letter writing committees. They're organizing fundraisers for political candidates. Not all of them are progressive, of course. One group of parents in New Jersey just pushed back against a new vaccination law. Other groups are too focused on changes in our own privileged town, and aren't advocating for all kids. But there are other parent groups that line up more with my political leanings. 

This situation isn't getting a lot of attention from the press, because most journalists have full time jobs in the cities. Even the education reporters aren't showing up to Board of Ed meetings. I am. And so, weirdly enough, being a stay at home parent gives me a professional advantage. Life is funny that way. 

So, on this greige day, I'm working and not working at the same time. At noon, I've got a date with Lauren at the hair salon who will make my hair a more uniform red and give me a good Jersey blowout. And we'll talk. She'll tell me about her mixed race family and her husband's contracting hustles. We'll talk about her middle school son and his struggles in school. I'll walk out of the salon with sleek red hair and some fodder for half a dozen articles. 

At some point, I'll figure out how to make more money from all this working and not working, but that's for another day. 
 

Twitter (serious Laura - work and links) Twitter (serious Laura - work and links)
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The Magic of Marching Band
I've wrote an article about how marching band helped to rewire my kid's autistic brain. The Hechinger Report published it this week. 

Read about it here
Painting and Working in Coffee Shops
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Laura McKenna · 861 Bingham Rd · Ridgewood, NJ 07450-2111 · USA

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