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August 22, 2014

Where people who live in Illinois were born:

Foreign immigration is a hot topic these days, but the movement of people from one state to another can have an even bigger influence on the United States’ economy, politics and culture. Americans have already seen this with the Western expansion, the movement of Southern blacks to Northern cities and the migration from the Rust Belt. The chart for Illinois vividly illustrates the Great Migration of blacks from the Deep South to the North. By 1960, about 9 percent of Illinois residents were born in the South; Mississippi was the No. 1 source of migrants.


Where people living in Illinois were born. 
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch explained
 
Plastic debris of all sizes, including bottles, cups, bags, toothbrushes and grain-sized pieces, represents from 60 to 80 percent of the world's total marine debris, according to the EPA. Most recently, footage of the Japanese tsunami of 2011 and the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 have vividly underscored the deterioration of some of the world's most remote seas, showing them to be veritable garbage soups, awash in chunks of junk including metals, glass, rubber, medical waste, fishing gear, but most of all, plastics. 

                          

Marine garbage comes from many sources, including galley waste and other trash from ships, recreational boaters, fishermen and offshore oil and gas facilities; boxes and merchandise from large containers ships; rivers that carry storm water-runoff and other waste; poorly maintained landfills; and beach litter.

 
Having achieved great success in Chicago, the Green Office Challenge is going state-wide! The program encourages friendly competition amongst buildings to achieve energy, water and waste reductions. Registration begins September 1st. See full details at www.illinoisgoc.com.

Health Value of Trees


In the first effort to estimate the overall impact of a city’s urban forest on concentrations of fine particulate pollution, a U.S. Forest Service and Davey Institute study found that urban trees and forests are saving an average of one life every year per city. In New York City, trees save an average of eight lives every year. Fine particulate air pollution has serious health effects, including premature mortality, pulmonary inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, and altered cardiac functions. In a study recently published on-line by the journal Environmental Pollution, researchers David Nowak and Robert Hoehn of the U.S. Forest Service and Satoshi Hirabayashi and Allison Bodine of the Davey Institute in Syracuse, N.Y., estimated how much fine particulate matter is removed by trees in 10 cities, their impact on PM2.5 concentrations and associated values and impacts on human health.

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