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Gemini e-Newscast #125

November 21, 2019

In This e-Newscast:

In a recent collaborative study, Gemini Observatory and Subaru Telescope uncover the massive (and larger than expected) structure of a distant supercluster. Mapping the formation of these ancient superclusters is a critical step in understanding the dark matter and dark energy that shape these structures. The Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) played a vital role in confirming these structures. Follow the link to read more.

DRAGONS First Public Release

After many years in the making, it is with great excitement that we announce the first public release of Gemini's new Python-based data reduction platform, DRAGONS, Data Reduction for Astronomy from Gemini Observatory North and South. In an article published today, DRAGONS’ capabilities were vital in enabling scientists to quickly reduce data critical to observations of the interstellar comet Borisov. See image below, and click here for more details.
Gemini North telescope image of the comet C/2019 Q4 (Comet Borisov) obtained on the night of November 11-12, 2019. The image was captured by the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) using three filters in optical light. Because the comet’s motion is relatively rapid, the three images were combined by averaging the position of the comet in the images to produce the single color composite shown here.
Credit: NSF OIR Lab/Gemini Observatory/AURA

Planning for a New Era in Astronomy Communications

In early November, the GEMMA (Gemini in the Era of Multi-Messenger Astronomy) project brought together science communications professionals to explore the unique opportunities and challenges of communicating Multi-Messenger and Time-Domain Astronomy, two rapidly growing fields in astronomy. Funded by the US National Science Foundation, this communications summit hosted more than 30 participants for two days at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Maryland, an AURA-managed facility.
The group of approximately 30 communicators attending the GEMMA Communications Summit held on November 7–8 2019 in Baltimore, USA. At the back (L–R) are: Martin Hendry (LIGO), Richard Terrile (JPL), Christine Pulliam (STScI/NASA), Swati Sureka (NSF), Matthew Dudley (Johns Hopkins University), Ivy Kupec (NSF), Peter Edmonds (Chandra/NASA), Janice Harvey (NSF’s OIR Lab/Gemini), Dave Finley (NRAO), Iris Nijman (NRAO), Joshua Chamot (NSF), Robert Hurt (Caltech/IPAC), Elizabeth Landau (JPL), Gordon Squires (TMT), Whitney Clavin (Caltech), Shari Lifson (AURA), Ethan Siegel (Blogger, Forbes), Megan Watzke (Chandra/NASA), Ranpal Gill (LSST), Amanda Kocz (GMT), Peter Michaud (holding NSF logo, NSF’s OIR Lab/Gemini), Janesse Brewer (facilitator, 23.4 Degrees), Ray Villard (STScI/NASA), John Blakeslee (NSF’s OIR Lab/Gemini). Front (L–R): Lars Lindberg Christensen (NSF’s OIR Lab), Rick Fienberg (AAS), Pamela Gay (PSI), Heidi Hammel (AURA), Chris Davis (NSF). Missing are Nancy Levenson (STScI) and Hussein Jirdeh (STScI/NASA).
Credit: NSF’s OIR Lab/NSF/AURA

The GEMMA Podcast

In part II of our 2I/Borisov series for the GEMMA Podcast, GEMMA intern Chance Spencer interviews Michał Drahus, a FUGA Postdoctoral Fellow at the Astronomical Observatory of Jagiellonian University in Poland. They discuss the timeline of his team’s observation of Comet 2I/Borisov starting with the initial notification, coordinating those observations with Gemini North telescope, and their preliminary findings from the data. Click here to listen to Part II.
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