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SEPT 25 2019

282

On being a healthy creative, the 2019 Design Census, and what even is fake news anymore

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Credit: The Creative Independent

Stuff like this, folks. Can’t get enough of it

Balancing health with productivity? Working through illness? Knowing when to take a break? The connection between creativity and wellbeing? The Creative Independent’s got all these topics covered. Read and download their zine, featuring essays from Mitski and Nick Cave, grocery lists, and more.

Credit: Mass Design Group

No more turning a blind eye

Anjulie Rao’s article, Power, Violence, and Chicago’s Architectural Biannual is all about how “this year may end the unstoppable homage to dead white men and narratives that neglect how architecture has victimized communities of color.” Read on.

Credit: AIGA

The state of the state

Almost 9,500 people participated in AIGA National’s design census. Some of the results are unsurprising. Others? Well. Look for yourself.

Credit: Jean Jullien

A chit-chat with illustrator Jean Jullien

Everpress spoke with Jean Jullien about visibility, his collaborative approach, and what he looks for in a project. Nice and candid!

Credit: Braille Institute of America

Accessbility in type! Huzzuh!

Atkinson Hyperlegible—the winner of Fast Company’s 2019 Innovation by Design Awards for Graphic Design—is a typeface that has been carefully and quirkily designed for people who cannot usually read type very well. How? Hiding in plain sight.

Credit: Adam Silver

Make your forms. Don’t break your forms

Looking for the right place to put those dang buttons? Adam Silver tells us where to put buttons across a range of different forms based on research and best practice. Thanks, Adam.

Credit: Pete Gamlen

This article about media literacy may conventionally be “fun,” but...

...it’s a super important read! Learn more about how our emotions skew our truths (and what we used to consider universal truths), along with some philosophy and wild stats (like that current research estimates that at least 60 percent of news stories shared online have not even been read by the person sharing them).