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Attention DAC Members! The First Friday Newsletter belongs to YOU. Please send in your organization's upcoming events, newsworthy accolades, resources and more to be featured In each month's First Friday Newsletter. If you have questions or to submit your info please email: southcarolinadac@gmail.com

 

A monthly update complete with the latest news and resources brought to you by the Diabetes Action Council of South Carolina.

 


 

A common complication of diabetes is diabetic eye disease. Diabetic eye disease refers to a group of sight-threatening eye problems that people with diabetes may develop.

Glaucoma is one of these diseases.

 
Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness in the United States. Glaucoma has no early symptoms that’s why half of the people with glaucoma don’t know they have it. 

For More Information Visit The Links Below:

https://www.glaucoma.org/glaucoma/diabetes-and-your-eyesight.php

https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/outreach-campaigns-and-resources/glaucoma-resources/glaucoma-awareness-month


2022 Prediabetes Coalition Funding Opportunity


The Diabetes Action Council of South Carolina (DAC) in partnership with Wholespire will release a request for proposals (RFP) in early 2022. The funding will be used to develop and implement an action plan addressing social determinants of health (SDOH) impacting prediabetes and diabetes prevention and management at the local level using The In It Together SC: Preventing Diabetes in SC discussion guide. 
 
Contact Kenishia Golden-Smith 
Statewide Infrastructure Coordinator 
Diabetes Action Council of South Carolina
Mobile: (803) 232-8370
Email: southcarolinadac@gmail.com

 
That's Public Health
 

 

A new APHA web series is making it easier for friends, family and community leaders to appreciate public health.

 

Launched today by the American Public Health Association and Complexly, the “That’s Public Health series features short, easy-to-understand videos on a range of public health topics.

 

 
Image from the first episode of "What is Public Health?"
 

The first episode, “What is Public Health?” can be viewed and shared online now on APHA’s YouTube channel. The four-minute video provides an overview of public health and how it benefits all Americans. You might recognize the host, APHA’s own Mighty Fine.

 

Other episodes in the 20-part web series will focus on health equity, climate change, gun violence, racism and more. Look for new episodes every Tuesday on APHA’s YouTube channel.

 

“We want viewers to come away from this series with a new understanding, to say to themselves ‘Oh, that’s public health,’” said Georges Benjamin, MD, APHA’s executive director. “It’s an educational tool, it’s entertaining and it’s something that can be easily shared.”

 

“That’s Public Health” videos can be embedded on websites, posted on social media and included in class materials.

 

To watch and subscribe to “That’s Public Health,” visit APHA's YouTube channel.

 

 

Don’t miss any of our upcoming diabetes messages created to help you prevent type 2 diabetes or manage and thrive with diabetes. Sign up NOW to become a “Diabetes Insider” and continue receiving the most current and useful diabetes information available. 
 

Sign up NOW for Diabetes Insider

For More Information:

 

 
 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   
TTY: 888-232-6348


Team-based Care Improves Blood Pressure Control and is Cost-Effective 
 
The Community Guide The Community Preventive Services Task Force
 

The Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF) recommends team-based care to improve patients’ blood pressure. A systematic review of evidence shows team-based care increases the proportion of patients with controlled blood pressure and reduces systolic and diastolic blood pressure. A separate review of economic evidence indicates team-based care is also cost-effective. These findings update and replace the 2012 CPSTF recommendation for team-based care.

A group of doctors and healthcare professionals

Why is this important?

  • High blood pressure increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, two leading causes of death for Americans.
  • Nearly half of U.S. adults have high blood pressure, and only about 1 in 4 (24%) have it under control.
 

Share this information with others!

Intervention Summary—read a summary of the evidence review and CPSTF finding

News and Announcement—include this story in your newsletter, or share the link with colleagues

One Pager—use this one-pager as a quick reference.
 

Implementation Resources

 
Tips for Eating Healthy on a Budget
 


Healthy eating is key to maintaining blood sugar levels in your target range. But the cost of nutritious foods can quickly add up.

 

Eating healthy when money is tight can be challenging. There are many ways to save money on the foods you eat to manage your diabetes. With a little know-how and planning, you can enjoy nutritious foods without breaking the bank.

 

Learn tips for eating healthy on a budget

Learn grocery shopping tips to help set you up for success.

Learn more about diabetes education and support. 


For More Information:

 
 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

1600 Clifton Rd   Atlanta, GA 30329   1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)   TTY: 888-232-6348

Resources 

Be sure to subscribe to our DAC Flicks Channel on YouTube.
There you will find episodes of Wellness Wednesday, the "In It Together SC: Preventing Diabetes in South Carolina" docuseries, and more!

 
CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE
 

 

Copyright © 2021 Diabetes Advisory Council of South Carolina. All rights reserved.

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