Eat more vegetables.
Theme: Branching Out
From NPR: "The dietary guidelines promote variety," Jeanine Bentley, a social science analyst at the USDA's Economic Research Service. "But when you look at it, there isn't much variety. Mostly people consume potatoes, tomatoes and lettuce." While we are HUGE fans of potatoes and tomatoes, we know how important a varied diet is to health, and let's face it, keeping eating interesting! Every week we work to bring you some stuff you love, plus some veggies you've maybe never seen before. It's fun for us and it's GREAT for your health. Win-win!

WESTCHESTER PEOPLE: Open house for new & future members of Westchester Green Business Certification at 8am 10/20 at the Business Council of Westchester’s office. Westchester business leaders who have recently joined WGB-Certified and those who are interested in learning more about membership are welcome to attend. Field Goods counts towards the certification! REGISTER HERE FOR 10/20 OPEN HOUSE BREAKFAST FOR NEW & FUTURE MEMBERS

SUPERCHARGE YOUR SCHOOL: Make sure you tell the PTA at your school about our fundraiser program, Carrots Not Candy. 

Want $100? If you think a friend would enjoy veggie delivery to their workplace, tell them to Contact Paige. Once there are 5 people signed up, we put $100 on your account. Spread the veggie word!
FUN FACT ABOUT SUBSCRIPTIONS
You can order the ADDITIONAL SUBSCRIPTIONS on a one time only basis in our website! The extra subscriptions are listed at the bottom of the newsletter. This week is a great time to try stuff:
Fruit Subscription: Eco Gala Apples
Herb & Allium: Nasturtium (edible flowers) & Parsley
Cheese: Basil Pesto Chevre  
We also have lots of other goodies to buy. Get shopping. Log in to your account here.

Please don't WASTE food and energy.  
ORDER/CANCEL DEADLINES
!
Tuesday delivery: Saturday 11:59 pm
Wednesday: Sunday 11:59 pm
Thursday: Monday 11:59 pm
Friday: Tuesday 11:59 pm
  • Our veggie guarantee: If you're not loving something, let customer service know!!  (This is how we reduce waste and cost.)
  • Items are subject to change depending on weather and farm availability. 
  • Tip 1: Any item you would cook, you can also freeze.
  • Tip 2: A dull knife conspires against you and slows you down. A sharp knife makes your food taste better (and look better, too). NY Times
  • Tip 3: Any green needs to be as dry as possible, wrapped in a paper towel in a plastic bag and kept in the fridge crisper.

Carrots A colorful, versatile standard. Roasted, steamed, marinated, or raw, you can't go wrong with some orange on your plate. Whistledown Farm (OG) 
Storage: 3-4 weeks in the fridge.
Ginger Curry Carrot Soup (pre-tested on fussy kids)
Roasted Balsamic Carrots
Sesame Carrot Salad
Butter Roasted Carrots with Thyme
Honey-glazed Carrots
Simple Carrot Soup
Baked Carrot Oven Fries
Carrot Puree wth Hazelnut Tapenade
Sweet Carrot Risotto
Celeriac A starchy, versatile root vegetable with a more mild taste than celery. NPR calls it “the vegetable world’s ugly duckling”, but we like to think its looks add to its charm… Juniper Hill Farm (CO)
Storage: 10-14 days in the fridge. 
Celeriac french fries: cut into short stalks, boil for two minutes, then cover with a mix of salt & pepper, garlic, and rosemary. Bake at about 375 degrees for 45 minutes or until golden brown.
Celeriac Chips
Smashed Celeriac
Celeriac Coleslaw
Parsnip and Celeriac Bake
Pepper and Honey-Roasted Roots
Celery Root and Parsnip Puree
Onions (Red OR Yellow) Standard & Family Only A pantry staple. Juniper Hill Farm (CO)
Storage: 2-3 months in the pantry.
Red: Braise, glaze, roast or eat raw. Fabulous in salads, soups, and baked dishes.
Balsamic-Glazed Red Onions
Roasted Red Onion and Garlic Soup
Yellow: Caramelize onions in 10 minutes: Place chopped onions in a dry pan without salt and cook over medium-high heat until dark brown and softened, about five minutes. Add oil and a pinch of salt, then cook for five more minutes until completely soft. Throw on top of bread for a snack, or use as a garnish to just about any meat or fish. Add to pasta, soup, or pizza.
Grilled Mixed Peppers and Onions
Balsamic Grilled Onions
Caramelized Onions
Fortune Apples Excellent for pies and sauces, Fortunes are crisp with a spicy flavor. Pro tip: combine Fortune apples with a sweet apple, such as Golden Delicious, for tasty and well-balanced applesauce. Fix Brothers Farm (FAM) 
Storage: Up to a month in the fridge.
Old-fashioned Apple Crisp
Apple Pie Cheat with store bought crust (one for the bottom and one for the top) and no one will be the wiser.
Apple Turnovers
Apple Pancakes
Apple Sauce
Lettuce (Red OR Green) Put fresh salads on your table as often as you can. For a more filling and flavorful boost add roasted nuts, died cranberries, roasted sunflower seeds, shaved parmesan, or chick peas. Farm at Miller's Crossing (CO) 
Storage: Up to 5 days in the fridge.
6 Salad Dressings to Know by Heart
Swiss Chard Cooked chard is a great stand-in for spinach. The stems can be steamed or grilled like asparagus. While Swiss Chard is naturally bitter, cooking mellows the flavor. Unless the stems are tender, remove them and just prepare the leaves. You can prepare chard in a jiff by sautéing it in olive oil with some garlic—toss in some chili for a little zip. Markristo Farm (CO)
Storage: 5-7 days in the fridge. 
Sautéed Chard with Garlic and Chili,
Chipotle Cheddar Chard
Gnocchi with Chard and White Beans
Stuffed Chard with Marinara
Swiss Chard with Olives and Lemon
Asian Style Swiss Chard
Grilled Tomato, Mozzarella and Swiss Chard Wraps
Garlicky Sautéed Swiss Chard
Echalions Onions + shallots = echalions. Also known as the Banana shallot, these babies have the ease of onions with the sweetness of shallots. They are perfect for braising with meats, roasting with vegetables, or in soups. Finely chop and add to broths and sauces, or sauté with mushrooms. A very glamorous allium grown in the Catskill Mountains at Skymeadow Farm (CO)
Storage: One month in the pantry. 
Garlic According to the New York Times, garlic has been known for its therapeutic benefits since ancient times. Studies have linked it to lower cholesterol, serum triglyceride levels, and blood pressure. Sulfur-containing compounds including allicin give garlic its pungency, along with high levels of vitamin C, vitamin B6, manganese and selenium, which seem to be responsible for garlic’s beneficial cardiovascular effects. Allicin is a powerful antibacterial and antiviral agent. You can freeze whole bulbs of garlic and individual cloves. One of the benefits is that freezing makes the cloves much easier to peel. When you need some garlic, just pop a clove or two off and put the bulb back in the freezer. Shaul Farm (FAM)
Storage: 3-5 months in a **COOL** dark pantry for the whole head. Individual unpeeled cloves will last 7-10 days at room temperature. To freeze, wrap whole head in aluminum foil or seal in airtight container for up to a year.
Roasted Garlic: Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Peel away outer layers of the skin around the garlic bulb. Cut about 1/4 inch off the top of the bulbs, then coat with olive oil. Wrap each bulb with aluminum foil and place in a baking pan. Bake for 30-40 minutes until golden brown and tender inside (test with a fork or toothpick). Dress up burgers or sandwiches, add to soups or mashed potatoes, or toss in a salad with balsamic Dijon dressing.
How to Roast Garlic
Garlic Broth

Additional Subscriptions

  • Herb & Allium: Nasturtium (edible flowers) & Parsley Letterbox Farm Collective (OG) 
  • Fruit: Eco Gala Apples Fishkill Farm (IPM)
  • Cheese: Basil Pesto Chevre Goats & Gourmets
  • Bread: Rosemary Country White Loaf Cafe Le Perche 
  • Pasta: Carrot Shells Knoll Krest Storage: Use within a week refrigerated, or freeze for 1 month.

Any questions? Email info@field-goods.com

Key for growing methods:
  • CO - Certified Organic
  • OG - Organically Grown (farm uses organic methods but does not have certification).
  • IPM - Integrated Pest Management (methods used to reduce the use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers).
  • FAM - Family farm (farm often uses organic and IPM methods but may also use chemical fertilizers and pesticides. As a general rule small farms use far fewer chemicals than large industrialized operations).
  • Non-GMO - None of our products are GMO.
Bringing you a better way to eat.
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