Eat more vegetables.
Theme: Tips for the Fussy Crowd
We all remember turning our noses up at something (or a lot of things) as children...probably thanks to some over-boiling of veggies that otherwise would have been home runs for our tastebuds. We've found that roasting is foolproof: veggies get sweet, crispy, and irresistible. Remember, 30-40 minutes at 400 degrees. A close second: mashing! Mix a new veggie like turnips in with a classic favorite like potatoes to ease kids into a new flavor. 

SUPERCHARGE YOUR SCHOOL: Make sure you tell the PTA at your school about our fundraiser program, Carrots Not Candy. 

Want $100? If you think a friend would enjoy veggie delivery to their workplace, tell them to Contact Paige. Once there are 5 people signed up, we put $100 on your account. Spread the veggie word!
FUN FACT ABOUT SUBSCRIPTIONS
You can order the ADDITIONAL SUBSCRIPTIONS on a one time only basis in our website! The extra subscriptions are listed at the bottom of the newsletter. This week is a great time to try stuff:
Fruit Subscription: Jujubes
Herb & Allium: Chives, Garlic, Echalions
Cheese: Garlic Dill Cheese Curds 
We also have lots of other goodies to buy. Get shopping. Log in to your account here.

Please don't WASTE food and energy.  
ORDER/CANCEL DEADLINES
!
Tuesday delivery: Saturday 11:59 pm
Wednesday: Sunday 11:59 pm
Thursday: Monday 11:59 pm
Friday: Tuesday 11:59 pm
  • Our veggie guarantee: If you have a quality issue, let customer service know!!  (This is how we reduce waste and cost.)
  • Items are subject to change depending on weather and farm availability. 
  • Tip 1: Any item you would cook, you can also freeze.
  • Tip 2: A dull knife conspires against you and slows you down. A sharp knife makes your food taste better (and look better, too). NY Times
  • Tip 3: Any green needs to be as dry as possible, wrapped in a paper towel in a plastic bag and kept in the fridge crisper.

Sweet Potatoes are easy. Put some orange on your plate this week. Just bake and enjoy with butter and salt. Juniper Hill Farm (CO) 
Storage: 3-4 weeks in the pantry.
Sweet Potatoes Stuffed with Chipotle Black Bean & Corn Salad
Twice Baked Sweet Potatoes
Honey Roasted Sweet Potatoes
Crispy Baked Sweet Potato Fries
Sweet Potato Burritos –Here's a new thing to do with your sweet potatoes. Turn them into a yummy burrito filling with beans, onions, garlic, and Mexican spices. A filling main dish that works up quickly (cook the potatoes the night before if you are in a hurry). Burritos are a great way to hide vegetables that your kids won't normally touch—trust us, we sneak vegetables into lots of things!
Pie Pumpkin Pumpkins are part of the Winter Squash family and can be used interchangeably with many different Winter Squash varieties. There are dozens of varieties of pumpkins ranging in color from near-white to green. Varieties that are best used for cooking are generally called sweet pumpkins. Barber Farm (OG)
Storage: Up to a month in the pantry. 
Pumpkin puree is very easy to make and freeze.  Simply cut in half, remove seeds and pulp, cover with aluminum foil, then bake at 350 degrees for an hour or so (until tender).  Remove meat from shells and puree in a blender. Pour into plastic bags and freeze for future use.
Fast and Easy Pumpkin Soup
  • 1 pumpkin
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ginger
  • 1/2 cup half and half
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Cut the pumpkins in half, scoop out the seeds, and place skin-side down on a baking sheet. Bake for 35 to 45 minutes, or until soft. Scoop out the pumpkin flesh into food processor and puree until smooth. Pour pureed pumpkin into a saucepan and add the chicken broth, water, maple syrup and spices. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Remove the soup from heat and stir in the half and half.
Pumpkin Sage Pasta
Penne Pumpkin Pasta
Pueblo Pumpkin Stew
Pumpkin Tomato Curry
Pumpkin Apple Soup
 
Brussels Sprouts Love ‘em or hate ‘em, either way they’re fantastically healthy. Can’t get your kids to commit? Try sautéing with bacon and raisins or topping with Parmesan cheese to upgrade the taste. Hepworth Farms (CO)
Storage: 3 days in the fridge.
Crispy Lemon Roasted Brussels Sprouts
Garlic Stir-Fried Brussels Sprouts
Steamed Brussels Sprouts with Butter and Chives
Globe Turnips Pretty and delicately flavored. Mash, sauté, or boil. Do half mashed potato-half mashed turnip to ease the kids in. Rexcroft Farm (IPM) 
Storage: 2-3 weeks in the fridge.
Smashed Turnips with Horseradish
Simple Simmered Purple Top Turnips
Living Lettuce Put fresh salads on your table as often as you can. For a more filling and flavorful boost add roasted nuts, died cranberries, roasted sunflower seeds, shaved parmesan, or chick peas. Radicle Farm (CO) 
Storage: Up to 10 days in the fridge or on countertop.
6 Salad Dressings to Know by Heart
Broccoli Rabe Did you know that broccoli rabe is more closely related to turnips than broccoli? It is NOT supposed to have big flower heads like broccoli. To prepare, trim the stems, toss with garlic & olive oil, add a splash of liquid, and sauté for a few minutes (you do not need to peel the stems). Toss with pasta & some good Parmesan cheese or with rice & soy sauce. Formisano Farms (FAM)
Storage: Up to 5 days in the fridge. 
Braised Broccoli Rabe:
Bring salted water to boil.
Add a bunch of broccoli rabe.
Boil 2 minutes.
Drain and squeeze moisture out of the broccoli rabe.
Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil.
Add chopped garlic (as much as little as you like).
Add broccoli rabe and cook for about 4 minutes.
Done.
Grilled Broccoli Rabe
Broccoli Rabe with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
Spaghetti with Broccoli Rabe
Broccoli Rabe and Caramelized Onions
Spicy Broccoli Rabe and Shrimp
Chorizo, chick peas and broccoli rabe a quick but hearty one pot stew for a chilly night.
Grilled Broccoli Rabe still got the grill out?? try this
Broccoli Rabe with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
Spaghetti with Broccoli Rabe
Baby Beets Nothing sweeter than a baby beet! Try roasting or grilling the beets and braising the greens. Some tips for roasting:
  • The roots will come off with the skin after roasting. With baby beets you don't need to remove skin, just give them a good scrub. However, if you’d like you can rub off the outer skin with a paper towel when cool.
  • Roast in a pocket of aluminum foil with olive oil—baby beets cook in about 30 minutes at 400 degrees.
Barber Farm (OG)
Storage: Two weeks in the fridge. Chop off the greens and use this week.
Roasted Baby Beets with Braised Beet Greens
Warm Beet Salad with Greens
Beets & Greens Salad with Cannellini Beans
Beet Greens
Roasted Beet and Winter Squash Salad with Walnuts
Roasted Vegetable Ragout:  Have some carrots left over? Throw it all together in this hearty winter vegetable dish. 
Lemon Herb Roasted Beets
Beet Risotto
Sweet Potato and Beet Hash
Beet and Apple Salad
ECO Golden Delicious Apples Deliciously (go figure) sweet and crunchy, the golden delicious apple is a classic kid pleaser. Serve slices with peanut butter or slip in sandwiches with a sharp cheese for a sweet-salty flavor surprise. Fishkill Farm (IPM)
Storage: Apples will hangout for a month in the fridge.
Golden Delicious Apple Tart
Old-Fashioned Apple Crisp

Additional Subscriptions

  • Herb & Allium: Chives, Garlic, and Echalions Sparrowbush Farm (OG), Shaul Farm (FAM), and Skymeadow Farm (CO)
  • Fruit: Jujubes (dried red dates, very sweet, great with coffee) Evergreen Farm (FAM)
  • Cheese: Garlic Dill Cheese Curds Palatine Valley Dairy
  • Bread: Pumpkin Cranberry Loaf Cafe Le Perche
  • Pasta: Tomato Basil Orecchiette Knoll Krest Storage: Use within a week refrigerated, or freeze for 1 month.

Any questions? Email info@field-goods.com

Key for growing methods:
  • CO - Certified Organic
  • OG - Organically Grown (farm uses organic methods but does not have certification).
  • IPM - Integrated Pest Management (methods used to reduce the use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers).
  • FAM - Family farm (farm often uses organic and IPM methods but may also use chemical fertilizers and pesticides. As a general rule small farms use far fewer chemicals than large industrialized operations).
  • Non-GMO - None of our products are GMO.
Bringing you a better way to eat.
 Twitter Twitter 

Copyright © 2015 Field Goods, All rights reserved.