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People make all kinds of demands of art—we want it to be beautiful or challengingly ugly; to be “true” (whatever that means) or playfully illusionistic; to encourage piety or protest. More than anything, however, we ask it to show us something we haven’t seen before—a new way of seeing, or feeling, or understanding. This issue of Art in Print looks into the fundamental creative act of visualizing the invisible.

Eight experts from different disciplines consider art, science and visualization, as participants in the UK-based research network, “Picturing the Invisible”:

The Art in Print Recommended Reading List continues with Part II: Artists’ Books; Books About Artists’ Books; and Making, in its many permutations.

From Edinburgh, Ruth Pelzer reports on Thomas Kilpper’s physical and conceptual excavation of the North British Rubber Company building there.

In Dublin, Róisín Kennedy reviews the National Gallery of Ireland exhibition illuminating the long overlooked Irish Painter-Etchers of the 19th and 20th centuries.

In New York, Megan Liberty looks through the blue light of Lorna Simpson’s new screenprinted paintings. 

The British Museum’s ambitious Edvard Munch exhibition is reviewed by Paul Coldwell.

A retrospective surveying the career of printer-publisher Kip Gresham is discussed by Jason Ions.

Paper conservators Karen Köhler and Irene Brückle report on the pedagogic power of print collections.

Judy Hecker selects Bundith Phunsombatlert’s printed broken porcelain as the winner of this issue’s Prix de Print. Like the Dane Mitchell Perfume Plume on our cover, it asks us to think about causality and to acknowledge the incompleteness of the visual record. 

   
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