Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory - A dynamic public / private partnership. 
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Four Biomedical Engineering Faculty Will Join the AIMBE College of Fellows

The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the pending inductions of Edward Botchwey, Jaydev Desai, Sathya Gourisankar, and Machelle Pardue to its College of Fellows. The College of Fellows is comprised of the top two percent of medical and biological engineers in the country. The most accomplished and distinguished engineering and medical school chairs, research directors, professors, innovators, and successful entrepreneurs, comprise the College of Fellows.

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Georgia Tech Will Play a Key Role in New Partnership to Advance Production Standards in Biomanufacturing

The Georgia Institute of Technology will play a key role in a new public-private partnership to help establish best practices and eventual industry-wide standards for the production of therapies using living cells to treat a range of conditions.

“We are poised to make a significant impact in how cells and regenerative medicine products are manufactured across the world through this new strategic partnership,” said Krishnendu Roy, Robert A. Milton Chair and professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

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GTNeuro Researchers on the Cutting Edge are Exploring the Frontier Between Our Ears

Imagine trying to eavesdrop on the human brain, with its complex, chattering galaxy of 86 billion neurons, each one connected to thousands of other neurons, holding cellular conversations through more than 100 trillion synaptic connections. It is a dense and noisy communication network, much of it hidden deep within precious tissue. We’ve pondered over, poked, and prodded the brain for centuries. But so much of what goes on inside our skulls is a mystery – neuro-research is still closer to the starting line than the finish.

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DNA “Barcoding” Allows Rapid Testing of Nanoparticles for Therapeutic Delivery

Using tiny snippets of DNA as “barcodes,” researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson’s disease. 

“We want to understand at a very high level what factors affecting nanoparticle delivery are important,” said James Dahlman, assistant professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. “This new technique not only allows us to understand what factors are important, but also how disease factors affect the process.”

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Trio of Labs Link Tendon Overuse Injury to Degenerative Changes in Shoulder Cartilage

“This was very much, pardon the pun, a joint effort,” Johnna Temenoff says about the research, which demonstrates for the first time the degenerative effects of tendon overuse (tendinopathy) on surrounding tissues in the shoulder joint. The Temenoff team worked with the labs of Manu Platt and Robert Guldberg, resulting in a research article recently published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research, entitled “Supraspinatus Tendon Overuse Results in Degenerative Changes to Tendon Insertion Region and Adjacent Humeral Cartilage in a Rat Model.”

It’s a partnership that could lead, down the road, to new therapeutics and preventive medicine for people with shoulder injuries” says Temenoff, professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering and co-director of the center for Regenerative Engineering and Medicine.

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Brain-computer Interface Allows Fast, Accurate Typing by People with Paralysis

A new research report from Stanford University highlights a high performance brain-to-computer interface that can enable people with paralysis to type words and messages with much higher performance than has previously been demonstrated. One of the first authors of the report, published today in eLife, is Chethan Pandarinath, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. Pandarinath helped lead the research at Stanford before his recent move to Emory and Georgia Tech.

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BME Team Reaches InVenture Finals

A team of students from the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering is a finalist for the 2017 InVenture Prize at the Georgia Institute of Technology. CauteryGuard, comprised of four BME majors, is among the six finalists that will compete for the $20,000 prize on March 15 at the Ferst Center in the InVenture Prize Final Round, which will be aired live by Georgia Public Broadcasting.

What originally started as a group project in a required BME course has evolved into a product designed to, “eliminate injuries associated with electrocautery devices while maintaining their usability and functionality,” explains Dev Mandavia, whose CauteryGuard teammates and fellow inventors are Jack Corelli, Hunter Hatcher, and Devin Li.

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2017 Class of Petit Undergraduate Research Scholars Most Diverse in Program History

Historically speaking, women have been underrepresented in professions heavy in science technology, engineering, and mathematics (the STEM fields). You wouldn’t know it to look at the 2017 class of Petit Undergraduate Research Scholars. This year’s class – tied for the largest number of students, 22, with last year’s class – features 16 women, a record number in the program’s 18-year history. They represent nine different majors, reflecting the multi-disciplinary approach the Petit Institute takes toward research. The largest group (six students) is majoring in biomedical engineering (BME) in the Coulter Department.

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Balakrishna Pai Named One of Georgia Tech’s Top Teachers

Balakrishna Pai, director of instructional laboratories in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory, has been selected to receive the 2016 Class of 1940 Course Survey Teaching Effectiveness Award. “What makes Bala’s class so special is that he challenges and empowers his students to find their own problem to investigate,” said Joe Le Doux, associate chair for undergraduate learning and experience in the Coulter Department. “His class is extremely motivating to students. Congratulations to Dr. Pai for creating a such a significant learning experience for our students.”

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Copyright © 2017 Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech & Emory University, All rights reserved.

The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University is united by our dedication to improving the health and well-being of all by fostering the next generation of leaders in biomedical engineering worldwide. We are highly collaborative, interdisciplinary innovators in basic and translational research and education. View our website

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Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech & Emory University · 313 Ferst Drive, Room 2127 · Atlanta, Georgia 30332 · USA